Munich Neuroscience Calendar

Event:

18.01.2024, 14:00 TUM-NeuroImaging Center

Event Type: Talk
Speaker: Isabelle Ripp
Institute: TUM

Title: Unveiling the Interconnected Nature of Cognition: Reinforcement Learning and Working Memory as Manifestations of Cognitive Mapping

Location:
Zoom
Ismaninger Str. 22
81675 M√ľnchen

Host: Franziska Knolle
Host Email: franziska.knolle@tum.de
Abstract:
Join the Research Seminar:

https://tum-conf.zoom.us/j/66486345358
Meeting ID: 664 8634 5358
Passcode: 170230

We are looking forward to a great discussion.

See full programme: https://franziskaknolle.com/journal-club-tumnic/

Abstract:
The cognitive mapping framework posits that the brain encodes spatial and experiential information in a structured, navigable format, principally instantiated within the hippocampal-entorhinal system. Given its multifaceted role in retrieving, storing, and working with information, cognitive mapping emerges as an ideal candidate for investigating the potential unification of diverse cognitive processes, aiming for an improved and holistic understanding of the general architecture of cognition. This presentation will delve into a theoretical analysis that places working memory and reinforcement learning as exemplary case studies within the cognitive mapping paradigm, proposing that these cognitive domains are interwoven within a singular, multidimensional representational space. By examining the roles of working memory in short-term information retention and manipulation, alongside reinforcement learning in adaptive, experience-based decision-making, the discussion seeks to illuminate how cognitive mapping serves as an overarching framework that could integrate and enhance our understanding of these processes. Preliminary findings underscore the plausibility of a unified neural architecture for cognition, setting the stage for more integrated research approaches. Though in its formative stages, this investigation represents a step towards a transformative interpretation of cognitive architecture with implications for both theoretical and applied neuroscience.


Registration Link: